Round 5: Anand makes his move

The GRENKE Chess Classic reached the mid-way point on Rosenmontag, the highlight of the German Carnival season, and a day when paupers can traditionally trade places with kings. It seemed the same might happen on the stage, as tournament underdogs Georg Meier and Daniel Fridman had Mickey Adams and Fabiano Caruana on the ropes, while Arkadij Naiditsch had a full-blooded game against Vishy Anand. In the end, however, the aristocrats of world chess drew, while the king upheld the social order with a win that saw him move into outright second place.

Read more: Round 5: Anand makes his move

Round 4: Naiditsch bounces straight back

Where would we be without Arkadij Naiditsch? For the third day in a row his game saw a dramatic time scramble and the only decisive result on the stage of the GRENKE Chess Classic. On this occasion he emerged victorious, while Mickey Adams and Fabiano Caruana played a sharp and hard-fought draw. World Champion Viswanathan Anand was agonisingly close to a first win, but an endgame slip allowed Daniel Fridman to escape.

Read more: Round 4: Naiditsch bounces straight back

Round 2: Naiditsch beats Adams after epic battle

Arkadij Naiditsch emerged victorious after a rollercoaster 7-hour game that saw the German no. 1 and Mickey Adams jockey for the initiative. That game overshadowed the sharp contest between Viswanathan Anand and Fabiano Caruana, where the young apprentice unleashed some more deep preparation to hold the champion at bay.

Read more: Round 2: Naiditsch beats Adams after epic battle

Round 3: Bloodshed and violence

For the second day in a row Arkadij Naiditsch lit up the stage of the GRENKE Chess Classic, but on this occasion it was his opponent Fabiano Caruana who was the last man standing after a brutal time scramble. Elsewhere Viswanathan Anand failed to make headway against Georg Meier and Michael Adams’ long grind brought no dividends against Daniel Fridman, though it did at least prove his painful loss in round two hadn’t lessened his appetite for chess.

Read more: Round 3: Bloodshed and violence

Round 1: Caruana off to a flying start

When Baden-Baden hosted arguably the world’s first supertournament back in 1870 it began in mid-July. 143 years later February snow was falling on the German spa town as tournament director Sven Noppes welcomed the players onto the stage. Things soon warmed up, however – Adams and Anand threw caution to the wind, Naiditsch and Fridman engaged in a fierce struggle, but it was Caruana who claimed the day’s only win. The Italian trapped Georg Meier’s king in the centre before ruthlessly applying the finishing touches.

Read more: Round 1: Caruana off to a flying start